British Esports Association becomes a Ukie member after months of collaboration

The British Esports Association has joined the UK Interactive Entertainment (UKIE) trade body as a member, after several months of close collaboration.

The British Esports Association has joined the UK Interactive Entertainment (UKIE) trade body as a member, after several months of close collaboration.

The British Esports Association is a not-for-profit national body set up to support grassroots competitive gaming in the UK, an area that is viewed by many as essential for the creation of a stable esports ecosystem in Britain.

Ukie is one of the two major trade bodies in the UK, with many publishers, developers and esports companies in the United Kingdom signed up to work together and achieve beneficial results for the gaming and esports space.

Ukie and the British Esports Association have been collaborating long-term on how to approach and interact with educational establishments and the media to help them understand the competitive ecosystem in the country, what esports actually is and what the industry entails.

Andy Payne, the chair of British Esports Association, said in a press release: “I am really glad that we have joined Ukie. At British Esports we are focused on supporting and promoting the grassroots esports scene, working with players and fans. Our projects around schools and libraries will support those communities by promoting teamwork, building confidence and inspiring the digital workforce of the future. Our aim is to help to make the UK a winning environment for the esports industry.”

Ukie added:  “Ukie is delighted to welcome the British esports Association as our latest member, joining other major stakeholders active in esports in the UK today including: esports event organisers ESL, Multiplay and Gfinity; developers and publishers such as Riot Games, Hi Rez, Activision Blizzard and EA; and teams and university leagues, Team Dignitas and the National University Esports League.

“Ukie looks forward to working closely with the British Esports Association to grow the sector from the grassroots, collaborating on building the profile of the sector in the UK and inspiring the next generation into esports.

“Ukie’s current esports initiatives include developing new esports qualifications and expanding our Digital Schoolhouse esports competition to give over 1,000 children from schools all over the country to compete against each other and get a taste of the wide range of roles that make up esports. And as the main point of contact for government policy and regulation relating to esports in the UK, we will be calling for more support from government for esports in this country.”

This probably won’t change too much in the esports industry externally, but having a closer relationship between a not-for-profit trying to grow the UK’s grassroots scene and a trade body for the UK games industry is great for both parties, and hopefully it’ll foster a better esports scene for the entire United Kingdom.