British Esports Association partners with EOB Academy, esports workshops backed by Prince’s Trust

British Esports Association partners with EOB Academy, esports workshops backed by Prince’s Trust
Jake Tucker

The British Esports Association has partnered up with the Enemy of Boredom Esports Academy (EOB), a series of workshops for young people interested in esports which is backed by the Prince’s Trust.

The EOB Esports Academy offers educational programmes for 14-30 year olds. These workshops are designed to help young people and the unemployed to access new opportunities in the esports sector.

Courses center of skills around League of Legends, game design, journalism, 3D printing, virtual reality and social media skills. A press release states that the intention is for the courses to “build confidence and provide a qualification,” and they’ll be hosted by WUWO Media.

There are already two EOB Esports Academy locations. EOB Esports Academy Watford has been in operation since May 2017, the London academy opened in September 2017. Another academy will launch in Birmingham in 2018.

EOB is also working on an EOB League, a grassroots schools league for secondary schools and sixth form centres. This will start with four schools in South London taking part.

Steven Godwin, creator of the Enemy of Boredom Esports Academy, commented: “It’s a great feeling to be teaming up with others to create a positive and strengthened future. WUWO Media’s EOB Esports Academy is delighted to be partnering with the British Esports Association.

“We share a common goal, and that's to promote esports, educate young people and provide grassroots participation. Having the knowledge and skills available from British Esports helps the young people at the EOB Esports Academy build confidence, gain qualifications and gain careers.”

Andy Payne, chair of the British Esports Association added: “The work of Enemy of Boredom is important and aligns well with our goals at the British Esports Association – to promote, improve and inspire.”

“Getting people interested and involved in esports from a young age can not only help bolster the industry in the long-term, but it also gives something positive back to the community, promoting teamwork, communication and development.”

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